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. what will the u.s. do in those countries, if anything? plus, does the united states have a responsibility to intervene in the humanitarian crisis that was this woman trashing a liquor store when she did not receive prompt attention from a clerk? we'll discuss. first, let's get to the news live at 5:30 a.m. at 30 rock in new york city. >>> american military officials are claiming initial success in isolating moammar gadhafi's regime, after a weekend of punishing allied air attacks in libya. according tocy officials, coalition strikes have crippled gadhafi's air defenses and a no fly zone is in place over the country. although gadhafi himself is not a target of what is being called operation odyssey dawn, at least not now. one of the strikes caused extensive damage to the libyan leader's compound in tripoli last night. at this hour, gadhafi's whereabouts remain unknown, but he has vowed to fight a quote long, drawn-out war with western forces. >>> meanwhile, the pentagon says there is so far no evidence that civilians in libya have been harmed in the conflict, although it w
and western attacks from the air, and we talk to the u.s. general in charge. >>> under control. a new breed of air traffic controllers tang over with fresh questions about safety still in the air. >>> and hanging tough. brave new worries about the crippled nuclear plant, but we find survivors of the japanese disaster giving everyone a lesson in resilience. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. i'm lester holt in tonight for brian williams. for a seventh straight day the u.s. and the allies bombarded targets in libya, still trying to break the back of moammar gadhafi's assault on rebel-held cities. the u.s. for its part says it's prepared to take a back seat, but exactly what the ultimate goal is and even who's in charge of this operation are still somewhat ill defined tonight. nato says it plans to take full command, but is still seeking consensus on a military strategy. in a moment we'll hear from the general in charge of u.s. forces there, but first to the ground where rebels are taking their own fight to gadhafi's forces. today nbc's r
. >> thank you, jim, for that. >>> president obama says it's not always up to the u.s. to step in when there's turmoil overseas. but in a preview to his national address on monday, the president says the current crisis in libya demands america's attention. >> the united states should not and cannot intervene every time there's a crisis somewhere in the world. but i firmly believe that when innocent people are being brutalized, when someone like gadhafi threatens a bloodbath that could destabilize a national region, then it's in our national interest to act. >> nbc's mike viqueira is our national correspondent on alex. >> what prompted the president to speak out on monday? >> after criticism from the left and the right, democrats and republicans here in washington. the president is suffering from two perceptions here, alex. first, this came very suddenly. usually when americans start to see tomahawks flying off or airplanes in flight drops dropping smart bombs, it comes after weeks if not months of debate. there was no such -- there was no such action. secretary of state hillary clinton was i
shattered by a new round of gunfire that follows a weekend of u.s. led air strikes. president obama answering questions this afternoon for the first time since sending our fighter jets into action. >> the core principle that has to be upheld here is that when the entire international community, almost unanimously, says that there is a potential humanitarian crisis about to take place that a leader who has lost his legitimacy decides to turn his military on his own people, that we can't simply stand by with empty words. >> one of this weekend's bombings badly damaged president gadhafi's compound. pro-gadhafi forces opened fire on a crowd of rebels in mizratah today killing nine of them gaining control of that area seen as critical for gadhafi on a strategic level. what is happening in libya? the latest headline from the uprisingings throughout the middle east look like this away from libya. yemen also in crisis right now. the president is losing his grip on power. he dissolved his cabinet over the weekend but for the growing groups of protesters that's not enough. some of the members
>> couric: tonight, the u.s. uses a warplane as the allies keep up the assault on libya and qaddafi remains defiant. >> (translated): we win. we will be victorious in this historical battle. we will not surrender. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, they survived one disaster, now these japanese have been forced to take shelter against another threat-- nuclear radiation. america's nuclear problem. where to store permanently more than 145 million pounds of spent fuel rods. and college students struggling to make the grade. what some schools are doing to make sure they graduate. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it's four days into a u.s.-led assault on his military, and libya's moammar qaddafi has lost radar installations, tanks, and naval facilities but not his defiance. he appeared in public tonight in tripoli vowing to fight on and telling supporters he will win and will not surrendered. qaddafi's forces kept up their attacks on civilians today in a n
, quote, in the very near future about the u.s. role going forward. the government met with the african union to hammer out a solution. there's violence in other areas of the region as well. in jordan, the associated press reports more than 100 people injured. clashes in ahman were the most i violent in that country in two months of protest. in bahrain, security forces fired tear gas and pellets at anti-government protests. thousands defied a ban on gathering followi ining prayers. and in yemen, the leader says h he's ready to step down, but only if he can leave the government in safe hands. gadhafi is now negotiating. the leaders of tunisia and egypt are already gone. yemen is on the verge of being knocked out, as you heard. these long-running dictatorships are on the ropes. why? because history is changing before our very eyes. there used to be a time when barberism and conquest was par for the course. it was what was expected. the mongols once wiped out a town and destroyed every building, but they also diverted a river that ran through the town. you want to know why? they wanted to
. >>> in chile, president obama tried to clarify. >> it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. >> senators on both sides of the aisle are concerned about the end game. >> if we are going into a war with libya, we should declare war on libya. we should pull together with our allies and try to figure out a plan of how that war is to be won. >> we do not have a clear diplomatic policy or a clear statement of foreign policy that is accompanying this military operation. >> there is a growing rift in the coalition over who should be in control. >> no apparent cooperation. some people want to turn it over to nato, the maiamericans and t brits. >> french president ruffled feathers by announcing publicly that french fighters were in the air before his international counterparts were briefed. whoever is in control, arizona republican senator john mccain says, there is only one way to end it. >> a stalemate is a very, very badout come. american policy is that gadhafi must go. >>> a naval facility was hit overnight east of tripoli. robert gates is in moscow. gates says gadhafi is misleading the russia
will lead the operation when the u.s. steps back in the days ahead, though nato is expected to play a major role. meanwhile, a u.s. air force fighter jet crashed today in eastern libya. the two men on board ejected and were rescued. a cbs news poll out tonight finds most americans are following the events in libya closely and nearly seven out of ten approve of the air strikes. mandy clark begins our coverage from the scene of that fighter jet crash. >> reporter: this is all that remains of the american f-15e that went down last night. a steady stream of people came to have a look. saleh saeed saleh, a local farmer, was eager to show us the wreckage. when it it this ground he says it sounded like a rocket exploding. he thought qaddafi's forces were on the attack. officials say the fighter jet crashed because of a mechanical error rather than any enemy fire. it landed east of benghazi which is in the heart of rebel territory. the jet's crew ejected safely. were they okay? were they injured? "the person i saw had minor injuries, just scratches" he says. one of the americans landed in a nearby
site and take our non-scientific "you decide" poll. should the u.s. go after moammar qaddafi? 14% of you have say yes. you can still weigh in. bill: we have a fox news alert. police on the scene at the airport. a suspicious package located near one of the baggage carousels. not quite sure what's in it if anything. police say they do not think it's related to what we saw last night. did you see this ranging fire last night? look at these pictures. this is at the airport in miami. the fire breaking out in the area where the fuel is kept. it was not near a runway or terminal. this morning there could be flight delays because the airport is running at 40% fuel capacity. look at the night skylight up in miami. we are giving you a live report at the airport to find out what happened at the fire and also what's going on with this suspicious package. >> tense moments in the sky as two passenger flights are forced to land without help from anyone in the airport control tower. it happened at reagan national airport just across the river from our nation's capitol. take a listen as the contr
is at the white house. jim, let's begin with you in the pentagon now. what is the u.s. military saying about the report that a french jet attacked and destroyed a libyan aircraft? >> well, there were all sorts of conflicting reports from the beginning after a french pilot radioed in to the command aboard the mt. whitney, the u.s. command ship out there in the mediterranean that he had shot down a libyan war plane. at the time, u.s. officials said they could not confirm it and continued to check, but subsequently, it turns out, and again, these are still conflicting reports, that apparently this french pilot shot a libyan airplane of some kind, whether it was a war plenty, whether it was a air,r enivia ple,has tve e, it landed at misratah or was already on the ground. now, of course, what made the first reports very significant is that would have been the first libyan aircraft, military, that would have challenged this no-fly zone. because not a single helicopter or libyan war plane has been in the sky since the u.s. and coalition war planes started to enforce that no-fly zone. but also, beca
on innocents here in the u.s. when will the government learn? from new york, defending freedom every night of the week, so long america! >> gregg: tripoli under attack right now. i'm gregg jarrett. a new round of air strikes by the international coalition and we're getting reports that air-raid sirens and explosions are being heard across the libyan capital and on calm's hometown. let's go right to steve harrigan. steve, what can you tell us. >> reporter: in the last few minutes we heard eight loud incoming ex pleogsz to the east of the city of tripoli. clearly audible. one round of three strikes, another round of five. we're not seeing the anti-aircraft fire that usually goes up. a remarkable shift in the battlefield. we are seeing the rebels advance quickly. they have taken four towns previously retreated. brega and one other. it's really being coalition powered that has paved the way targeting gadhafi forces and personnel carriers so the rebels have been able to advance so far without much of a fight. the government officials here say gadhafi forces are making a strategic retreat but it
in libya, what's the end game, how do we get out? the role the u.s. will play from here on out and how important is it that gadhafi goes. and how did we wind up fighting in a country that even the country's own defense secretary on sunday said is not a vital u.s. interest. tonight, we'll look at what the president needs to say and the big stakes for him politically in lya if the effort for him goes bad. then we'll bring the president's speech live from the national war college here inform washington, d.c. let's begin with andrea mitch l mitchell. and of course, the huffington post's howard fineman who is an msnbc political analyst. what must the president say? here's a couple of clips. >> when someone like gadhafi threatens a bloodbath that could destabilize an entire region and when the international community is prepared to come together to save many thousands of lives, then it's in our national interest to act. >> that was the radio address on saturday. here's what he said in south america last week about why we're there. >> our military action is in support of an international man
ruled yemen for 32 years. he is a key u.s. ally in the fight against al qaeda. meanwhile, president obama plans to speak to the nation monday night about libya to explain why he ordered u.s. military action and give an update on the operation. today french and british jets struck libyan artillery and tanks near ajdabiya. smoke could be seen miles away. late today, rebels began a new push to retake the city. and libyan state television showed damage from overnight air strikes in tripoli. nato, which is taking over control of enforcing the no-fly zone, said it's planning for a mission that would last three months. as other nations play a larger role, the u.s. is publicly taking a step back, but it's a small step. more on that from david martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: this is what the battle for libya looks like to a pilot. it's a british pilot attacking a libyan tank. but more than half the 96 strike missions in the past 24 hours were american. and so were all 16 of the tomahawk cruise missiles fired overnight. despite the announcement that nato would soon be taking command of t
on u.s. actions in libya. that speech is scheduled for monday, 7:30 p.m. eastern time. watch it live right here on the fox news channel. >> heather: as we reported at the top of the show we do have new reaction coming to the death of an american pioneer led the way for women and politics, broke that glass ceiling. >> gregg: joining us -- do we have -- apparently we don't. july july with the latest. >> julie: after suffering complications of blood cancer she had battled for 12 years, geraldine ferraro was surrounded by her family when she passed away this morning at massachusetts general hospital. and president obama just moments ago, he says he will forever be remembered as a trail blazer that broke down barriers for women. whether it was at a public school, a teacher, an assistant district attorney, member of congress or candidate for vice president. she fought to uphold the founding ideals of quality and justice and opportunity for all. she leaves behind her husband, three children and eight grandchildren. in a statement her family says geraldine ferraro was widely known as a leade
. at the same time, u.s. and coalition partners kept up the military attacks, launching 22 cruise missile on targets in tripoli. qaddafi's forces, however, are still better armed than the opposition and today they have the rebels on the run. they were forced to retreat just as they prepared to attack qaddafi's hometown of surt. instead, though, they were pushed back more than 25 miles, and not just by the military baby civilians who remain loyal to qaddafi. mandy clark reports tonight from the ever-shifting front line. >> reporter: an attack by qaddafi forces took rebels by surprise at bin jawad. they fought hard with everything they had but were forced back. and even while fleeing came under fire. they had originally retreated to the town because of a new threat rebels here say it wasn't just government forces but also residents firing from their homes that forced them to pull back. they confiscated these weapons handed out by qaddafi forces from locals who were loyal to the regime. how many weapons did you find in total? >> reporter: another problem the anti-qaddafi forces are facing: s
difficulties with that connection. >>> gruesome new details about a group of rogue u.s. soldiers on trial for murdering afghan civilians. "rolling stone" magazine publishing photos taken by a tank unit who call themselves the kill team. the shocking pictures you sigh here show the soldiers posing next to their kill, allegedly innocent and defenseless afghans. m mick, the pentagon trying to keep these pictures from the light of day. what's your reaction? >> the reality here is that the u.s. military, the army, first came upon this story almost a year ago when one of the soldiers of that so-called rogue squad there in afghanistan reported the fact that some of the soldiers in the unit had allegedly killed innocent afghan civilians. and in the course of that investigation, it was army investigators who actually uncovered 4,000 photos taken by soldiers. the vast majority of them happy snaps as you would see as if you were on vacation somewhere, but there were about 100, 120 or so showing dead bodies there in afghanistan, totally against afghanistan regulation. but the most egregious part abou
about the lack of air support from nato. as the u.s. and its allies consider whether or not to arm the ragtag opposition forces. providing arms could also mean sending in military trainers that would expand america's involvement even as president obama told brian williams that the u.s. has already accomplished its goals. >> now what we have done is accomplish what we set out to do at the outset, which is to make sure benghazi was not overrun and that thousands potentially of people were not killed. what we have also done is put gadhafi back on his heels. >> brian williams, of course, is the anchor and managing editor of "nbc nightly news" and joins me now. >> sometimes it is nightly noise. >> and most recently there is a lot of nightly concern about what is happening in libya what is happening with the rebels. you asked the key question. and asked whether or not we should be arming the rebels. let's look at part of that exchange. >> with all due respect, mr. president, watching the reportings of our two correspondents in libya, what it appears the rebels need is military equipment.
there. and gadhafi forces have been seen retreating about 50 miles to that oil port. the u.s. says they plan to continue striking unless he pulls back. this is a huge moral boost for the rebels who now say all the way to tripoli. for the first time in weeks, forces are moving backwards. it is very difficult work. shelled repeatedly by snipers. fires killed at least 115 people including some people and children. >> thank you very much for the live report. government protestors appear to have seized there. we are joined by ron allen. ron is tracking the new developments this morning for us in syria, jordan and all of the hot spots what is unfolding right now? good morning to you, ron? >> reporter: it's a day when the dust is settling here after violent protest. the first time that has happened in many months of lower level protesting here in jordan. that is what was so stunning. at least two people were dead and hundreds wounded. >> as thousands of syrians took to the streets again. a truck down. the security forces, more than 50 people killed. in the town. the uprising. video posted
or airplanes. he stressed the u.s. is diplomatically supporting the no-fly zone, not the enforcement itself. no american troops on the ground, no american planes, no enforcement itself, that's what we know. what we don't know is a lot bigger. joining us now, eugene robinson, pulitzer prize winning columnist for "the washington post." thanks for being here. >> good evening, chris. >> what do you make of president obama's remarks on libya today? are we now at war? was that the communication? even coming away from it, i had a hard time answering that question for myself. >> when i heard the president's speech, i thought gee, we might be, and here is why. he said very clearly that as far as he's concerned and the united states is concerned, gadhafi has lost the legitimacy to lead. he forfeited the right to be president of libya, and he set these demands, gadhafi has to stop, he has to withdraw, these are not negotiable and there will be consequences. so that to me says we are going to use force to make gadhafi do what we want him to do. >> and of course, if he doesn't do what we want him to do,
are overwhelmed. >>> in sendai, japan, there are signs of recovery. u.s. marines are busy there helping to clear away cars and other debris left in the tsunami's wake. >> we've been clearing it for the past few days, so we're making good progress. >>> let's head to tokyo and nbc's lee cowan who's developing stories there. >> reporter: it all stems from the injuries to the workers we talked about yesterday, the ones that were in the basement level of unit number three. they were trying to strip a cable there. they came in contact with radioactive water and had to be taken to the water. they were actually transferred to a hospital here in tokyo today so they could monitor their condition a little more closely. the consider is that the radiation levels were so high, and the water they stepped in, some 10,000 times that it should be, that the fear is now there is some kind of leak at the reactor itself. they don't know whether it's an actual breach in the core or the pipes themselves that are leaking but something is leaking. we don't know how much or how long it's been leaking and we don't know why
can convey a message to the american people why it is consistent with u.s. foreign policy goals? >> i do. we have to keep in mind the uprise negligent middle east - uprising in the middle east lends to developments. in the short run we can't controll the events completely. this is important in the middle east and to abanon the people of libya would have let qaddafi slaughtter his own people and put a damper on the efforts of the youngg people in the middle east and small democrats and those who want to liberalize those societies there. >> even with nato in command, are you concerned that ultimately the pressure will be on the u.s. if qaddafi fights for months? >> i am opposed to putting our own soldiers on the ground. i believe that the coalition that is in place led by nato and not the united states will find the right balance of approaches to support the people in libya and to see that there is a new regime in place and support the spirit of revolution and spirit of change and democratic societies in the middle east . so we have to watch this, and congress has a role to play in advi
operations, including ground attacks, taking over from the u.s.-led force. for more on what's happening with the rebel advance, we want to go to benghazi and richard engel. richard? >> reporter: the rebels here in eastern libya have never been stronger. they have regained in the last 24 hours all of the ground and more that they lost when gadhafi launched a counteroffensive. that counteroffensive which triggered western military intervention. after takinga ag ajdabiya yeste, there was no resistance and they were able to push about 100 miles after ajdabiya drive toward the west without any kind of resistance at all. we drove along this road and we saw on the side of the road the reason why they were able to make such an easy advance. dozens of gadhafi's armored vehicles and tanks that were completely obliterated from the sky. it has opened a corridor that the rebels are now just walking through. the rebels are concerned, however, that as there is this change of command, as nato takes more responsibility, that there will be a less aggressive military posture, a less aggressive series of a
. is the threat to the u.s. and the world growing? murderous attacksing libyan forces answer president obama's address with a new round of attacks on civilians, according to the rebels. >>> and camelot, it's not. the new miniseries on jfk and jackie o., many historians say it's more fiction than fact. we speak to the producer 0 of the series ahead. >>> good afternoon. we begin with the disaster in japan where the prime minister says the country is in a stalts of maximum alert, this as the fukushima crisis worsens. japan officials have said they believe there's been a partial meltdown at three of the plants' six reactors, that's half. now today radioactive water has been discovered in the maintenance tunnel at the plant. in a a spatefrtepha fr l io ocns e nd ncte peltoeer he nnoced 2 etrothor nd, stonrm plonm seepifr the damaged nuclear power plant into the soil outside the facility. plutonium is years. but so far, officials claim the levels found are not harmful to human health. meanwhile, more traces of radiation have been found in the u.s., raising new concerns. today in california one of
the u.s. will play the on going mission in libya. the president will give the address at national defense university. he's expected to assure americans that he can deliver on his vow that the u.s. will be a partner in the action and not in the driver's seat. head of the speech, secretary of state hillary clinton and defense secretary robert gates made the rounds on the sunday talk shows speaking on "meet the press", secretary gates may have added to the confusion about the libyan objective saying u.s. involvement in the country is not a national interest to the united states. >> secretary gates, is libya in our vital interest as a country? >> no. i don't think it's vital interest for the united states. but we clearly have interests there. and it's a part of the region which is a vital interest for the united states. >> i think a lot of people hear that and say that is striking. not in our vital interest yet we're committing military resources. >> then it wouldn't be fair to what bob said. did libya attack us? no. they did not attack us. but they were doing and gadhafi's history an
their leaders. listen. one u.s. ally calls the situation there, quote, deteriorating rapidlyof. remember, some officials are calling yemen the new wild west for al qaeda terrorists. we'll get to all of that in a minute. >>> first, mubarak is gon in egypt. gadhafi is under siege in libya. is bashar assad next? that's the question today rumbling across the middle east because the spark of rolution s reached the arab powerhouse syria. this is damascus today.ot antigovernment protests spread to the syrian capital and beyond. here's where it started, daraa, south of damascus. believe it or not, we are told with all the arrests about a month ago, a dozenz teen sz ho it started. they were arrested for spraying antigovernment graffiti. then on wednesday, this government forces opened fire in daraa. accounts remain sketchy, but the tape we're about to watch does give us some idea. as we sa, the exact circumstances remain unclear, as do the numberof deaths. but yesterday the government conceded it made a mistake and announced new reforms. today's sponse from the sreet suggests that may not be enough. w
. is there a contradiction in what this mission is? because we've heard from u.s. officials gadhafi has lost legitimacy, they want him out, but the security council resolution talks about protecting civilians. what's the mission? >> if you talk to u.s. officials, they say the mission immediately is to stop the violence against the civilians. but then they also talk about a series of kind of stages that, in in other words, sequencing is the word they're using, one step at a time. they say okay, we're going to try to freeze his advance, especially to benghazi, and continue to tighten the noose in other ways. so they're freely admitting it make take some time to get him to step down, if he each does. i just got some new information from a senior u.s. official. we're here at the airport about to take off with hillary clinton to paris to that meeting on libya. he said that the libyans were still reaching out to the united states. in fact, the foreign minister musa kusa has been calling officials in the united states and they continue to say we're going to have a cease-fire, we're going to have a cease-fire.
, democratic congressman dennis kucinich speaks out. he wants to ban all funding from u.s. operations in that country. we ask him why live. nuclear mistake. operators say a strike in radioactivity that prompted evacuation wasn't accurate. after an error like that, can information from japan about the nuclear reactors be trusted? budget battle. at the beginning of the 112 congress, two freshmen from opposite sides of the aisle promise to work together but with another budget battle looming, can they do it? we talk to the two lawmakers again live. all of that, plus a scandal involving the new york city fire department. should the city be forced to pay money to those who couldn't pass the entrance exam? i'm breech breech and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now -- i'm shannon bream and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now. we begin in japan. the spike in radiation level that led to evacuation was just a mistake. we have the latest. >> reporter: it was a breach coming from the authorities this sunday and we heard an offic
to remove gadhafi from power using military force. instead top u.s. officials are working diplomatic channels to try and push the dictator o. hiarcltoonme t a very clear message to gadhafi, but we're also sending a message to people around him. do you really want to be a pariah? do you really want to end up in the international criminal court? now is your time to get out of this and to help change the direction. >> mike viqueira, good sunday morning to you. >> reporter: good morning action al alex. >> what else are we hearing? >> reporter: critics say there's something of a mixed message coming from the administration since the military action started a week ago yesterday. it's not only republicans, it's democrats as well. the administration on the one hand has a need to play to the arab street, but they're also now trying to play to main street here in the united states. they have emphasized all along that this is an international coalition that includes arab nations. at one point secretary clinton said we are not in the lead but clearly the united states has been in the lead. they
. thank you very much. >>> now to libya and another day of furious fighting. u.s. navy officials say coalition forces are attacking pro gadhafi troops who have tried to storm populated areas. libyan artillery, mechanized forces and mobile missile sites as well as ammunition supplies are also being targeted. the british say the libyan air force has been destroyed and coalition forces are now flying over the country with impunity. but reports are mixed about the rebels' ability to repel gadhafi's forces in misrata and elsewhere. nbc's jim ma say da joins us live now from tripoli. jim, is this a clear sign the coalition really is stepping up the intensity of their campaign? >> hi, martin. yes, it is a clear sign, and they're stepping up their campaign because they can step up their campaign now. they spent the first four, four and a half days of this operation taking out everything that would prevent them, prevent the airplanes, the nato planes from doing this very thing. they believe that the libyan air defenses as you suggested in your lead now are just about out of commission, which
, it looks like a long-term stalemate is a possible outcome. tonight's question -- will the u.s. and our allies have the political will to continue the longer efforts to drive gadhafi out of office if the war boggs down? and can we accomplish our objectives within the constraints of the u.n. resolution? we go to nic robertson in tripoli. it seems the gadhafi regime continues to try to spin a story. what are you seeing, and what are they trying to tell you? >> reporter: they continue to try show us that there were civilian casualties here. they believe if they can do that that will weaken the resolve. they took us to a farmhouse on the outskirts of the city where a missile or rocket had impacted in the farmland. they told us there would be civilian casualties. the stories we heard didn't add up. it was clear something had impacted, but there were no casualties to see and conflicting stories about who and what had been hit. what we did see driving out of the city to the east, clear signs of how the coalition aerial bombardment is effective here. we saw damaged bases, damaged buildings, and
will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's at stake in libya for the united states? the white house is promising, perhaps, monday or tuesday of next week. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of a u.s. ally. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way. how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more se
of the house of representatives are troubled that u.s. military resources were committed to war without clearly defining for the american people, the congress, and our troops what the mission in libya is and what america's role is in achieving that mission. what should the president do now? should he address the nation? should he meet with members of congress? all of the above? >> maybe all of the above. and i think the way boehner handled that letter was very thoughtful. he waited until the president was back on u.s. soil. as i understand the congressional briefings to date, what happened was bill burns, who's our undersecretary of state for policy briefed the senate on thursday afternoon as they were leaving town. on friday, the president convened the leadership of congress. however, it was a recess day. so most of them were hicked in te telephonically and the telephone didn't work so well. maybe he should have sent a plane to pick them up. but in any event, that briefing was not fully satisfactory. some members said, well, we're just going to be in the back of the line and we're not going to
, but despite eight days of bombing the u.s. says military ground forces loyal to president gadhafi still pose a significant threat. on monday, president obama will address the nation on the libyan crisis. >>> disaster in japan. japan's prime minister describes the situation as grave and serious, after another dangerous radiation leak is found at the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant. u.s. navy barges are bringing fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday morning, march 26th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a gorgeous spring morning in new york city. 20-something degrees. but who cares, it looks nice. >> that's a beautiful picture, russ. >> welcome to "the early show," i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we begin with the latest on the battle for libya. rebels have recaptured the key eastern city of ajdabiya. nato takes control of some of the u.s.-led operation in libya in a matter of days, and president obama will address the nation on monday night to explain u.s. involvement in
is preparing to take over the military campaign against moammar gadhafi. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's at stake in libya for the united states? the white house will address is monday evening. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of the u.s.-backed president there. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? >>> plus with hispanics making up 1 in every 6 americans and one in every 1 ever 4 children, the huge emphasis on the 2012 election. >>> finally, how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the
. officials says the u.s. launched 15 more tomahawk missiles in the last 24 hours this around tripoli. there were also new coalition air strikes against gadhafi's artillery and tank positions, including those vowing to overtake the key rebel-held city of ajdabiya in eastern libya. u.s. officials tell nbc news the u.s. could hand over the lead role to nato as soon as tomorrow. it appears for now u.s. warplanes will lead the difficult mission of attacking gadhafi's ground forces that could threaten libyan civilians. mike viqueira joins us live from the white house. we just learned president obama should be holding a conference call with members of congress. what are you hearing? >> reporter: that's right. jay carney appeared in the briefing room 12 minutes and informed us the president conducted a national security council meeting on the situation in libya this morning, and starting right about now, 2:00, it was scheduled to begin. the president will be calling congressional leaders, a conference call, where he will, quote, consult with them on the situation in libya. and of course, the
with a caveat. while nato will be in charge of enforcing the no-fly zone, it is the u.s. that will take the lead when it comes to the more difficult task of planning attacks on gadhafi's ground forces. even as the dictator promoted every soldier in his army today, the man leading the american mission is staying ca hard to make it hard for gadhafi and his troops to kill its own citizens and destroy property. but that is as i described yesterday, a delicate mission. >> nbc news chief news correspondent richard engel is in benghazi. what do we make of reports that gadhafi wants to meet with the opposition? >> we've heard many reports like that. we've also heard that gadhafi wants to send 2,000 people carrying olive branchs to benghazi, and one of the rebel opposition leaders said they're worried about this. they're worried it could be a trojan horse. they don't want these people to come into the city. they don't trust gadhafi at all to hold negotiations, they don't trust him to hold a cease-fire, and frankly don't want his representatives in benghazi or even close to where the rebels are. >> what a
very much. a week into the campaign the u.s. role in libya is about to change. nato will take over enforcement of the no-fly zone but rebels and pro-gadhafi forces are fighting it out street to street. nbc's richard engel is one of the first journalists to reach ajdabiya where there are battles raging now. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. rebels have taken about half of this city. gadhafi's forces still contain pockets and have tanked positioned around the edges. we have seen street-to-street fighting. we can hear gunfire now. rebels have been taking cover, firing machine guns, trying to find gadhafi's forces and drive them out. this is what the war in libya has become. the western air strikes will take out gadhafi's heavy weapons, tanks, aircraft and allow the rebels to push into cities themselves and fight it out almost hand to hand with gadhafi's forces in several cities in libya. >> you talk hand to hand. i was struck on thursday by your reporting and how poorly equipped the rebels seemed to be in terms of weapons. are you sai seeing indications that they are being supp
their leader leave now. what does all this mean for the u.s. war on terror? >>> asleep in the tower. troubling questions about who is keeping watch at the nation's other airports as officials now confirm an air traffic controller was napping on the job. >>> it's friday. so do you have your office beer ready? apparently booze in the workplace is making a comeback. could it actually make us more productive? >>> we begin with the devastate nug develop in japan, radioactive contamination from the troubled fukushima nuclear power plant more severe than first thought. japan's prime minister spoke just a short time ago, calling the situation there very grave and serious. nuclear safety officials now suspect a dangerous breach in the core of a reactor. the evacuation zone has expanded from a 12-mile radius. people who are up to 19 miles mr. the plant are being told to leave. >>> also this morning, japan's police agency says the official death toll from the earthquake and tsunami has now topped 10,000. more than 17,000 are listed as missing. >>> let's go live to tokyo, nbc's lee cowan is there. lee, wh
in the world right now. what is this one worthy of u.s. military intervention. i think if he answers those three questions, i think it will be an effective speech. >> amy, let me pose this to you. one of the challenges is he's not making this speech from the oval office but the national defense university. so i want to get a sense from you what you think the significance of that is, this location, not being at the oval office but being elsewhere. >> i think it's very significant and it's the president signaling once again we're not at war with libya. that this is a humanitarian mission. so to taking out of the oval office and to put it in other setting is to downgrade the importance of this military engagement. if you have it from the oval office, then this is a u.s. led military intervention and it sure looks like war. however, if you give this speech off-site, that, as i say, sort of downgrade as what this military intervention means. >> is itn effect too late for americans? 47% of americans support this intervention in military plan for libya. operationally, things are going pretty well
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